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Boo, our spokescat.

When new friends and customers see our domain name or email addresses they always ask, "So, do you have a big black cat?"  Naturally we tell them about our spokescat, Boo--our very large, black cat.

Boo was born in the spring of 1993 in Salem, Massachusetts.  Her mother lived up the street from our home. Her father lived in one of the stray colonies of huge black cats that inhabit Salem.  Boo was the smallest of the litter and each of the kittens was terrified of humans.  Boo immediately hid when she saw us, and we literally had to move aside a pile of scrap wood on the floor before we could pick her up. We knew that with enough love and patience, though, Boo would become a happy member of our household.

Boo adjusted well.  She had her favorite places to perch and hide.  For a few months she was much smaller than her roommates Clarice, Carmie, and Toffee. but soon enough she grew to her full size and was the biggest cat in the house.  Still, Boo remained shy and always deferred to the other cats.  It was always funny to see people's reactions to Boo when they met her.  Everyone commented on her size and some asked us why we had a baby puma in the house.

Boo and the other cats moved with us from Salem to the Cape.  Boo always found her favorite hiding spots, as well as "social" perches in each new home.

During the last year (2005-2006), Boo was diagnosed with hypothyroidism.  At first it was relatively easy to give her medicine by mixing it in tuna or moist cat food.  She enjoyed eating and had no trouble taking medicine, and she responded well to the treatment.  Over time, though, her appetite waned and we had to give her medicine through her ear.  Boo never felt comfortable being handled and forcing medication was stressful for her.  Eventually, Boo stopped eating completely and we knew the end was near.  We took Boo to the emergency clinic on Sunday, September 3, 2006 and found that her liver had stopped functioning.  We knew the only option of a long-term treatment plan using feeding tubes and/or syringe feeding was going to be extremely traumatic for Boo--and may not work.  As a family, we made the decision that Boo should not have to endure any more pain.  We were all with her and held her while the doctor administered the final shot, and Boo left us peacefully.  It was a very sad day for everyone.

The following are pictures of our friend, Boo.

Boo fit in the palm of our hands when we first brought her home.

Clarice and Boo eventually became good friends, but at first Clarice thought Boo was an amazing play toy!

Boo grew and grew and grew, topping out at about 16 lbs.